Re: Win2k3 LAN Routing Questions



Just as an aside, I would have thought getting a cheap router would be
easier and less risk to your server configuration than trying to route
through RRAS,
Anthony



"Steve Kellogg" <stevekellogg@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message
news:%23AGYwiczGHA.3424@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I've set up the network as you suggested but still can't route from one
segment to the other, but I can ping both router interfaces from both
segments. I'm new to RRAS and routing, so I may have made a mistake with
assigning routing protocols on the interfaces of the RRAS machine. If you
can tell me briefly how that should go I'd be grateful, otherwise I'll
make a trip to the bookstore and do some reading this weekend--I guess I
need to do that in any case.

Thanks again,

Steve



"Bill Grant" <not.available@online> wrote in message
news:uHxsFfXzGHA.4204@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
It is really a matter of knowing what you want to do. To route between
two subnets, all you need to do is enable IP routing on the router. In
RRAS that means enabling LAN routing. You certainly don't need NAT or
RIP.

If there was no other network involved, you simply make the router the
default gateway for both segments. Traffic for the "other" segment goes
to the router, which delivers it in the other segment. eg

192.168.1.x dg 192.168.1.1
|
192.168.1.1 dg blank
router
192.168.2.1 dg blank
|
192.168.2.x dg 192.168.2.1

I presume you have a NAT router somewhere and you want both subnets to
use that for Internet access as well as routing between the subnets. That
is pretty straight forward as long as you can add a route to your NAT
router. This is important because this router needs to know where your
new subnet is and how to reach it.

The segmented network would look like this. (Pretty much what you had
done).

Internet
|
public IP
NAT router
192.168.1.203
|
workstations
192.168.1.x dg 192.168.1.203
|
192.168.1.1 dg 192.168.1.203
RRAS router
192.168.2.1 dg blank
|
192.168.2.x dg 192.168.2.1

The vital bit to make it work is a static route on the NAT router.

192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

Without that route, the 192.168.2.0 network clients can't get to the
machines in the other subnet or to the Internet. If you enable NAT on the
RRAS router, clients in the 192.168.1.0 subnet can't get to machines in
the other subnet (because they are on the wrong side of a NAT router).
The setup which works is just LAN routing on the RRAS router and a static
route on the Internet router to direct traffic for the new subnet to the
internal router. This route also "bounces" traffic from the 192.168.1.0
to the 192.168.2.0 subnet. (ie traffic from a client in 192.168.1.0 going
to a client in 192.168.2.0 . It goes to the Internet router by default
and is redirected by the static route to the RRAS router).

Steve Kellogg wrote:
Thanks. The IPs are 192.168.1.205 and 192.168.2.1. Here's the
routing table:

Destination Network mask Gateway Interface Metric Protocol
0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.203 Local Area Connection 2 20
Network management
127.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 127.0.0.1 Loopback 1 Local
127.0.0.1 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 Loopback 1 Local
192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.205 Local Area Connection 2
20 Local
192.168.1.205 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 Loopback 20 Local
192.168.1.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.205 Local Area
Connection 2 20 Local
192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.1 Local Area Connection 3
20 Local
192.168.2.1 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 Loopback 20 Local
192.168.2.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.2.1 Local Area Connection
3 20 Local
224.0.0.0 240.0.0.0 192.168.2.1 Local Area Connection 3 20 Local
224.0.0.0 240.0.0.0 192.168.1.205 Local Area Connection 2 20
Local
255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.2.1 Local Area
Connection 3 1 Local
255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.205 Local Area
Connection 2 1 Local


I really need to take the time to read thoroughly about routing, but
if you can give suggestions to fix this simple scenario I'd love to
get the network segmented sooner rather than later.

Thanks again,

Steve

"Robert L [MS-MVP]" <noreply@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message
news:ebSFGZTzGHA.4176@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Posting the routing table here may help.

Bob Lin, MS-MVP, MCSE & CNE
Networking, Internet, Routing, VPN Troubleshooting on
http://www.ChicagoTech.net
How to Setup Windows, Network, VPN & Remote Access on
http://www.HowToNetworking.com
"Steve Kellogg" <stevekellogg@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message
news:ehKPgkSzGHA.3568@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I hope this is the right group for my question. If not, I'd
appreciate
being directed to the appropriate one.



I'm trying to divide a LAN into two segments to relieve congestion:
192.168.1.0/24 and 192.168.2.0/24.



I've set up RRAS on a dual-homed Win2k3 member server and installed
the LAN
Routing service and RIP, NAT and DHCP relaying protocols on both
interfaces.
I can ping both NICs from hosts on each segment, but I reach hosts
across
the segments. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.



Here's the NIC configuration on the router:



NIC #1

IP: 192.168.1.1

SNM: 255.255.255.0

DG: 192.168.1.203 (internet router)



NIC #2

IP: 192.168.2.1

SNM: 255.255.255.0

DG: None

-------------------------------------------------------



Here's the static route configuration in RRAS:



Interface 1

Destination: 192.168.2.0

Network Mask: 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.2.1



Interface 2

Destination: 192.168.1.0

Network Mask: 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.1.1



--------------------------------------------------------



If what I've provided so far reveals the error or if anyone can
suggest
things I may have left out (apart from a training course.) or
additional
information I should provide, I would be very grateful.



Thanks,



Steve






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