Re: Why does Office10 mso.dll file get installed on an Office11 system?

From: Eric Lawrence [MSFT] (e_lawrence_at_hotmail.com)
Date: 04/28/04


Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2004 23:40:55 -0700

It's possible that some component of Office didn't get rev'd and that's why
you see it. Also, you'll find that MSO gets installed by some nonintuitive
apps-- for instance, at least one version of Visual Studio installs MSO. I
don't know which version it uses, but I'd bet that VSNET uses MSO10.

-- 
Thanks,
Eric Lawrence
Program Manager
Assistance and Worldwide Services
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
"Howard Kaikow" <kaikow@standards.com> wrote in message
news:OJ9lh#NLEHA.3516@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> On my J drive, I have a Win 2000 system that has Office 2003 installed,
and
> has never had an earlier version of Office installed. I find that the list
> of available COM references in VS .NET 2003 includes references for both
the
> Office 10 object library and the Office 11 object library.
>
> The reference for Office 10 is to G:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft
> Shared\Office10, which is in an OS on the G drive in this multiboot
system.
>
> However, I also note that the system on the J drive has both J:\Program
> Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Office10 and
> J:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Office11, each of which has
a
> different mso.dll.
>
> Looking at the Registry, I see typelib entries for
>
> Microsoft Office 10.0 Object Library in G:\Program Files\Common
> Files\Microsoft Shared\Office10\mso.dll
> Microsoft Office 11.0 Object Library in J:\Program Files\Common
> Files\Microsoft Shared\Office11\mso.dll
>
> My questions include:
>
> 1. How did a reference to a never installed version of an Office object
> library get included in the registry?
> 2. What is the purpose of the, apparently, spurious J:\Program
Files\Common
> Files\Microsoft Shared\Office10?
>
>
> -- 
> http://www.standards.com/; See Howard Kaikow's web site.
>
>