Re: Why does excel turn numbers larger than 15 digits to zero?



rename the .csv file a .txt file. That will pop-up a wizard on opening. There you can choose the cells to be text.

--
Kind regards,

Niek Otten
Microsoft MVP - Excel


"Aaron" <Aaron@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message news:C2ABE410-5836-41F9-9B96-A808F357EE40@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
| Thank you for such a quick response Niek,
|
| but... my group frequently deals with .csv files that when you open then, it
| automatically sends the text to columns without allowing the option to turn
| the long fields to text.
|
| Is there an alternate way to open the file so it does not automatically send
| text to columns without asking?
|
| "Niek Otten" wrote:
|
| > Excel's numerical precision is 15 decimal digits.
| > If you need more, like for credit card numbers, format the cell as text before entering the "number" or precede the number by
an
| > apostrophe (which will not show)
| > Note that you van not calculate with these text-"numbers"
| >
| > --
| > Kind regards,
| >
| > Niek Otten
| > Microsoft MVP - Excel
| >
| > "Aaron" <Aaron@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message news:BD07B707-796E-43F5-BC03-5A85A9A20A4C@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
| > | When I type any number into excel that is greater than 15 digits, it turns
| > | all the remaining numbers to zero. For instance, if I enter 4444555566667777
| > | excel throws it into scientific format. When I turn it back to a number the
| > | number is now 4444555566667770.
| > |
| > | Any Idea why this is, and how I can make it stop?
| >
| >
| >


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