Re: Training and Career

From: mad dog (anonymous_at_discussions.microsoft.com)
Date: 05/31/04


Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 14:50:15 -0700

I would like to thank you all for your comments, they are
helpful. I do wish I had not used my email address
though, some idiot thinks he can actually get a virus
through and has been trying since the time of the post.

Kline pretty much hit the nail on the head with;
"I could not do my job without having a good
understanding of
networking concepts which include security, transport
infrastructure,
performance issues, geographical issues, etc, etc.
Software engineers
have always needed to understand more than simply how to
churn out
code, this is even more so in today's IT world."

I am in a rural area and was also caught in a bad
personal situation on top of a lot of other issues and
the economy. (Sorry if I sound like Edipus).

I know of several companies that have spent millions on
garbage, because they were sold what they wanted to hear.
One company in particular has had a revolving door of
outside vendors for an insurance replacement system since
1998. They refuse to train their own people in new
technology, they think they are going to save a buck,
hire "Inexpensive Consulting Companies", and after a
couple of years have nothing. They boot these
consultants, find new ones, and start the cycle all over
again. They are on their third such company. Each company
walks away with millions and business knowledge they can
apply to their next victim (They will produce,
eventually). The employees are not U.S. citizens. So
basically, everyone is paying top dollar to train someone
from another country because senior staff thinks they
will save a buck. (I have wondered how often this
scenario is repeated).

I have an awful lot of the basic pieces, lack anything
more than home networking, seeking to fill in as much of
the empty spaces as possible (and practice, practice,
practice). Last billing rate was $70 hr., I would be
happy with $10, minimum wage if necessary, just to have a
place to practice and build skills as well as learn
technique in a large business environment (although I
have not closed myself off to smaller firms). Have been
willing to relocate anywhere in the US, actually
interviewed for a position in London in 2002. If I didn't
find myself in the position I am in, I wouldn't believe
it possible. Just call me mad dog...

>-----Original Message-----
>>First, I can't quite see why
>>you're devoting a lot of time to network admin certs
and
>>all that - unless that's what you want. If doing .NET
>>development is really what you want to do, then you
>>oughta get on with it.
>
>I could not do my job without having a good
understanding of
>networking concepts which include security, transport
infrastructure,
>performance issues, geographical issues, etc, etc.
Software engineers
>have always needed to understand more than simply how to
churn out
>code, this is even more so in today's IT world.
>
>Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
>.
>