Re: IP address

From: senseofhumor13 (anonymous_at_discussions.microsoft.com)
Date: 03/01/04


Date: Mon, 1 Mar 2004 11:51:25 -0800

I'm not at all offended by your suggestion of
the "dummies" version of the network book. In fact, I
appreciate all the time and thought that you've put into
posting. And, as of matter of fact, I did read a little
bit of "Networking for Dummies" over the weekend. I found
it interesting and informative. I will take your advice
and look into reading the other books as well. Is Ziff
Davis the author for both the TCP/IP book as well as
basic networking?

Thanks again.
>-----Original Message-----
>I do apologize for that, I didn't realize that you were
that new to network
>computing.
>Your best bet is to pick up a beginners book on TCP/IP,
and one on basic
>networking. Ziff Davis Publishing has some nice ones
or, and please don't
>take
>this the wrong way, the "For Dummy's" series is also
quite nice.
>I used the "TCP/IP for Dummies" book to help me write a
mid-term paper in
>college, it got me an "A". After reading the books my
explanation will
>clear up somewhat I hope. If not, I will be glad to try
and explain it
>better.
>
>Again, I am sorry, and will try to keep your newness to
computing in mind
>if I get the opportunity to answer further questions.
>--
>Alan G
>"He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
>---------------------------------------------------------
-------------------
>---
>
>
>"senseofhumor13" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com>
wrote in message
>news:3a0e01c3fd86$26751c40$a101280a@phx.gbl...
>> Thanks for the well thoughtout explanation.
>> Unfortunately, none of it sticks to my brain. In case I
>> haven't made it evidently clear, I'm very new to the
>> computer world. I've been learning about computers for
>> the past 6 months or so. Other than the computer repair
>> class and a windows 2000 pro class (which I'm taking
>> now), I have no other experience. I'm going to print
your
>> posting and will look at it periodically. It looks
>> interesting, I just wish it was in english.
>>
>> Thanks
>> >-----Original Message-----
>> >If you have built your own network, then you control
the
>> IP
>> >addresses. As such you decide what the static IP
address
>> >will be.
>> >
>> >For example, here is a network with the following
>> equipment.
>> >2 - 2003 Advanced Servers acting as Domain Controllers
>> (DC1 and 2)
>> > and DNS servers
>> >1 - 2003 Advanced Server acting as a file server (FS)
>> >1 - Desktop Workstation
>> >1 - Laptop Workstation with wireless 802.11b
capability
>> >1 - Cable modem router providing DHCP services
>> >1 - Print server PS
>> >
>> >Since you are developing the network you decide to
>> configure it
>> >as Class C using the usual 192.168.1.x IP address
setup.
>> >
>> >Each DC needs a static IP since they are also DNS
>> servers. To be consistent
>> >lets also
>> >assign the file and print servers static IP addresses
>> also.
>> > So lets assign DC1 and IP address of 192.168.1.200
>> > DC2 gets 192.168.1.201
>> > Next FS gets 192.168.1.210 (lets leave some space
>> for other servers)
>> > Finally PS gets 192.168.1.240 (again more room for
>> other equipment)
>> >
>> >All the servers are connected to the router with an 8
>> port hub. Here you
>> >have developed
>> >the IP addresses for each of your servers.
>> >
>> >The workstation and laptop still use DHCP for their
>> address and connect
>> >directly
>> >to the router.
>> >
>> >Now the router uses DHCP itself to get an IP address
>> from your ISP
>> >and uses its internal DHCP to hand out addresses to
the
>> internal network.
>> >It also assigns itself the IP address 192.168.1.1 so
>> that it can communicate
>> >on the internal network. If you want to use a fixed
IP
>> address to connect
>> >to your ISP you will need to get on from them for the
>> router. Also you need
>> >to configure your router so that it will not hand out
>> any IP addresses
>> >greater than
>> >192.168.1.199 or lower than 192.168.1.2.
>> >
>> >Lets say the ISP assigns address 68.50.5.132 either
via
>> >DHCP or you enter it as a static address after asking
>> them for it.
>> >
>> >An example of the address route to the workstation
would
>> then be:
>> >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132
>> on the router
>> >Internally we go through the router from IP address
>> 68.50.05.132 to
>> > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
>> >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal
>> network to
>> > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.200 on
DC1.
>> >
>> >
>> >If we went from the ISP to DC1 it would be:
>> >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132
>> on the router
>> >Internally we go through the router from IP address
>> 68.50.05.132 to
>> > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
>> >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal
>> network to
>> > static IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.
>> >
>> >Hopefully that helps and my explanation hasn't
confused
>> things further,
>> >I just wish I had a way of showing this with pictures
>> also.
>> >--
>> >Alan G
>> >"He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
>> >------------------------------------------------------

---
>> -------------------
>> >---
>> >
>> >
>> >"senseofhumor13" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com>
>> wrote in message
>> >news:073d01c3fd4f$f53e2440$a601280a@phx.gbl...
>> >> I don't quite understand how I would come up with 
the
>> IP
>> >> address on my own, please explain.
>> >> >-----Original Message-----
>> >> ><anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in 
message
>> >> >news:00ce01c3fcc4$27d7f5c0$a601280a@phx.gbl...
>> >> >> So, where would I get the static IP from?
>> >> >
>> >> >Probably the ISP or SysAdmin if connecting to
>> another's
>> >> network.
>> >> >However, if you are running your own network, then 
you
>> >> come up
>> >> >with it yourself.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >.
>> >> >
>> >
>> >
>> >.
>> >
>
>
>.
>